Future OS IoT: Install Supported IoT Devices

Future OS IoT image was created for Raspberry Pi 4. After writing the image to the SD card and the first time you start your Raspberry Pi 4, it will automatically resize to the free space and reboot the system. System user "root" and password "future".

If you are using gnome, you can burn Future OS image to your usb using gnome-disk-utility software.

[1] Open gnome disks and plug the blank usb device into your computer.
[2] Select the blank usb device you inserted.
[3] From Drive Options, select Restore Disk Image.
[4] Select the Future OS img file you downloaded.
[5] Click the Start Restore button.

After the burning process is complete, your Future OS environment is ready. If you want to prepare the usb medium from the command line, open a terminal and execute the following command with root rights.

Warning: The following command assumes that you have downloaded the Future-Minimal-1-aarch64.img file and is located under the /tmp directory. Do not run this command if you have not yet downloaded the img file or it is not under the /tmp directory. It is also highly recommended to check which usb device you have plugged into your computer. If you specify an incorrect device, you may cause irreparable damage to your discs.

You can detect the usb device you want to write to as follows. Before plugging the device into your computer, open a terminal and run the following command.

[[email protected] ~]# lsblk
NAME                                          MAJ:MIN RM   SIZE RO TYPE  MOUNTPOINT
sda                                             8:0    0   1,8T  0 disk  
├─sda1                                          8:1    0 931,5G  0 part 
└─sda2                                          8:2    0 931,5G  0 part  
nvme0n1                                       259:0    0 931,5G  0 disk  
├─nvme0n1p1                                   259:1    0     1G  0 part  /boot/efi
├─nvme0n1p2                                   259:2    0     2G  0 part  /boot
└─nvme0n1p3                                   259:3    0 928,5G  0 part  
  └─luks-8f470e82-c84f-4c30-ab9f-c10e32324b2d 253:0    0 928,5G  0 crypt /

Note down the device names in the command output. In this example there are sda and nvme0n1 disks. Now plug a blank usb device into your computer and then run the lsblk command again.

[[email protected] ~]# lsblk
NAME                                          MAJ:MIN RM   SIZE RO TYPE  MOUNTPOINT
sda                                             8:0    0   1,8T  0 disk  
├─sda1                                          8:1    0 931,5G  0 part 
└─sda2                                          8:2    0 931,5G  0 part 
sdb                                             8:16   1   7,4G  0 disk
nvme0n1                                       259:0    0 931,5G  0 disk  
├─nvme0n1p1                                   259:1    0     1G  0 part  /boot/efi
├─nvme0n1p2                                   259:2    0     2G  0 part  /boot
└─nvme0n1p3                                   259:3    0 928,5G  0 part  
  └─luks-8f470e82-c84f-4c30-ab9f-c10e32324b2d 253:0    0 928,5G  0 crypt /

The lsblk command shows 7.4GB free disk in the sdb path that was not there before. Your usb device is /dev/sdb. Now that we have detected the correct device, we can now write the Future OS image to your device.

[[email protected] ~]# xzcat /tmp/Future-Minimal-1-aarch64.img | dd of=/dev/sdb bs=4M && sync

or

[[email protected] ~]# xzcat /tmp/Future-Minimal-1-aarch64.img | dd of=/dev/sdb bs=4M status=progress && sync

Warning: After the writing process is complete, it is recommended to wait 5 minutes before removing your usb device. Delayed writes are applied to such devices in all operating systems. After the command is complete, your computer can continue typing. Remove the prepared USB media 5 minutes after the end of the burning process so that it does not contain corrupt data!